Photo Blog

Understanding Ghana

Enjoy sights and sounds of Sub-Saharan Africa from a different perspective. The focus is currently on the West African nation of Ghana, its people, culture, and history

09 June 2017

Kente: Historical Fact

The Kente cloth is usually associated with the Ashantis but did they invent it? The Ewe people, especially those from Agortime-Kpetoe of Ghana claim that Kente which they call Agbamevor has always been their traditional cloth. According to history, they migrated from Egypt through Nigeria to their current location in Ghana with their skilled textile weavers. During the wars with the Ashantis, captured Ewe artisans were asked by... Read More
09 June 2017

The Loom: Weaving Kente

Kente, known as Nwentom in Akan, is a type of silk and cotton fabric made of interwoven cloth strips and is native to the Ashantis in present day Ghana, West Africa. Kente is made Bonwire, Adanwomase, Sakora Wonoo, Ntonso in the Kwabre areas of the Ashanti Region and also by Akans living present-day Ivory Coast. (Online)
09 June 2017

Adinkrahene Stamp

Adinkrahene (King of the Adinkra Symbols). Adinkra symbols, often made by woodcut from the Calabash, are used extensively in fabrics, pottery, and traditional Akan gold weights. Ashanti oral tradition attributes the origin of adinkra to Gyaman in modern-day Cote d’Ivoire. Adinkra cloths were traditionally only worn by royalty and spiritual leaders for funerals and other very special occasions. Ntɔnso, 20 km northwest of Kumasi, is the traditional center... Read More
06 May 2017

Asana Corn Drink

Asana (corn) drink with ice sold in a big gourd. DIY recipe and instructions.
01 May 2017

It Takes Moderation to Handle Power

It Takes Moderation to Handle Power. “Tumidie yɛ ɛhɔ ne hɔ”_Akan Proverb (Chief Linguist Kwame Frimpong Manso Adakare)
01 May 2017

Elmina Slave Castle In Ghana

This perspective of Elmina slave castle in Ghana eerily resembles a ship about to set sail. “In everlasting memory of the anguish of our ancestors. May those who died rest in peace. May those who return find their roots. May humanity never again perpetrate such injustice against humanity. We, the living vow to uphold this.” (Online image-Wikipedia)
09 February 2017

Currency: 50 Cedis (Front), 1980

Ghana currency (Front: 50 Cedis) – 1980, under the leadership of Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings. (Online image)
09 February 2017

Currency: 5 Cedis (Front), 1977

Ghana currency (Front: 5 Cedis) – 1977, under the leadership of General Ignatius Kutu Acheampong. (Online image)
09 February 2017

Currency: 2 Cedis (Front), 1978

Ghana currency (Front: 2 Cedis) – 1978, under the leadership of General Ignatius Kutu Acheampong. (Online image)
09 February 2017

Currency: 100 Cedis (Front), 1986

Ghana currency (Front: 100 Cedis) – 1986, under the leadership of Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings. (Online image)
09 February 2017

Currency: 100 Cedis (Back), 1986

Ghana currency (Back: 100 Cedis) – 1986, under the leadership of Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings. (Online image)
30 January 2017

Currency: 1 Cedi (Front), 1982

Ghana currency (1 Cedi) – 1982, under the leadership of Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings. (Online image)
24 January 2017

Carved Eating Bowls, Northern Ghana

Western Intervention – Slaves were forced to carve holes in this rock, located in a former slave camp in the Northern Region, to make their eating bowls. The bigger the hole, the more food a slave gets thereby increasing their chances of survival. (Online image)
24 January 2017

Musical Rocks, Northern Ghana

Western Intervention – The rock in the foreground is a “musical rock” that produces assorted sounds by beating different parts of its surface. The grassy area in the background is the dance floor where slaves were made to dance to keep moral high. Those who refused to participate were heavily punished. Northern Region. (Online image)
22 January 2017

The Portuguese Slave Castle At Elmina, Ghana

Elmina Castle was built by the Portuguese in 1482 as São Jorge da Mina (St. George of the Mine) Castle in present-day Elmina, Ghana (formerly the Gold Coast). It’s the oldest European building in existence below the Sahara. First established as a trade settlement, the castle later became one of the most important stops on the route of the Atlantic slave trade. The Dutch seized... Read More
22 January 2017

The Former Slave Fort At Elmina

To build the fort, the Portuguese had to demolish the homes of some of the villagers, who consented only after they had been compensated. They also demolished a rock that was home to the god of the nearby River Benya. (Online image-Wikipedia)
22 January 2017

The Former Slave Fort At Elmina

The Portuguese trader, Fernão Gomes, upon reaching present-day Elmina, discovered a thriving gold trade already established among the natives and visiting Arab and Berber traders. He established his own trading post, and it became known to the Portuguese as “A Mina” (the Mine) because of the gold that could be found there. (Online image-Wikipedia)
22 January 2017

The Former Slave Fort At Elmina

First established as a trade settlement, the castle later became one of the most important stops on the route of the Atlantic slave trade. The Dutch seized the fort from the Portuguese in 1637 and took over all the Portuguese Gold Coast in 1642. The slave trade continued under the Dutch until 1814; in 1872 the Dutch Gold Coast, including the fort, became a possession of... Read More
22 January 2017

Canon At The Former Slave Fort At Elmina

The new fort, signifying the permanent involvement of Europeans in West Africa, had a considerable effect on Africans living on the coast. At the urging of the Portuguese, Elmina declared itself an independent state whose Governor then took control of the town’s affairs. The people of Elmina were offered Portuguese protection. (Online image-Wikipedia)
22 January 2017

Canon Looking Out At Sea, Elmina Castle

The new fort, signifying the permanent involvement of Europeans in West Africa, had a considerable effect on Africans living on the coast. At the urging of the Portuguese, Elmina declared itself an independent state whose Governor then took control of the town’s affairs. The people of Elmina were offered Portuguese protection. (Online image-Wikipedia)
22 January 2017

The Courtyard, Elmina Castle

By the seventeenth century, trade in West Africa concentrated on the sale of slaves. The castle acted as a depot where slaves were bought in bartering fashion. The slaves, often captured in the inland by the slave-catchers, were sold to Portuguese traders in exchange for goods such as textiles and horses. The slaves were held captive in the castle before exiting through the castle’s infamous... Read More
22 January 2017

The Courtyard, Elmina Castle

By the seventeenth century, trade in West Africa concentrated on the sale of slaves. The castle acted as a depot where slaves were bought in bartering fashion. The slaves, often captured in the inland by the slave-catchers, were sold to Portuguese traders in exchange for goods such as textiles and horses. The slaves were held captive in the castle before exiting through the castle’s infamous... Read More
22 January 2017

The Courtyard, Elmina Castle

By the seventeenth century, trade in West Africa concentrated on the sale of slaves. The castle acted as a depot where slaves were bought in bartering fashion. The slaves, often captured in the inland by the slave-catchers, were sold to Portuguese traders in exchange for goods such as textiles and horses. The slaves were held captive in the castle before exiting through the castle’s infamous... Read More
22 January 2017

The Courtyard, Elmina Castle

By the seventeenth century, trade in West Africa concentrated on the sale of slaves. The castle acted as a depot where slaves were bought in bartering fashion. The slaves, often captured in the inland by the slave-catchers, were sold to Portuguese traders in exchange for goods such as textiles and horses. The slaves were held captive in the castle before exiting through the castle’s infamous... Read More
22 January 2017

The Courtyard, Elmina Castle

By the seventeenth century, trade in West Africa concentrated on the sale of slaves. The castle acted as a depot where slaves were bought in bartering fashion. The slaves, often captured in the inland by the slave-catchers, were sold to Portuguese traders in exchange for goods such as textiles and horses. The slaves were held captive in the castle before exiting through the castle’s infamous... Read More
22 January 2017

The Dungeon At The Slave Castle, Elmina

African captives were kept in the dungeons for months before they are forcefully shipped to the West to be sold as slaves. The black pigment covering the walls is the decayed blood of the unfortunate souls whose freedom was stolen one way or the other. There is an eerie kinda feeling down there. . (Online image)
14 December 2016

People: What Are Friends For?

Beautiful and smart looking Ghanaian girls hanging out on a Sunday afternoon. (2012). In Ghana, don’t be surprised to see people of the same sex walk down the street holding hands or in each other’s arms. Ghanaians understand the natural human instincts of touch, a sign of affection and brotherly/sisterly love.
12 December 2016

People: Little Ghanaian Girl

Little Ghanaian girl enjoys Sunday service with her mother. (Osu Presbyterian Church, 2012).
07 December 2016

People: The Sunday Girl

Sunday church service usually runs from 9am to 12pm, sometimes it goes as late as 3pm if there is a special event/celebration. Christianity is practiced by a majority of Ghanaians leaving behind the ancestral traditions that originated from ancient Egypt.
07 December 2016

Religion In Ghana: The Presbyterian Church

In 1828, the first group of missionaries (Johannes Phillip Henke, Gottlieb Holzwarth, Carl Friedrich Salbach, and Johannes Gottlieb Schmid) arrived from Basel, Switzerland, and settled in Christiansburg, Gold Coast (now Osu, Ghana). The Basel Mission that sent them had been founded by businessmen, industrialists, and philanthropists who wanted to create a different impression on Africa from that of their previous slave trading compatriots. As far back as... Read More
06 December 2016

Faces: Smiling Boy From Ada

Interesting facts & figures: Total population: 25 Million. Population under 18 years old: 11.2 Million.
28 November 2016

It Takes A Community To Feed The Masses

The community comes together at noon to haul in the day’s catch, individuals are paid in kind, with fish. Pulling in the seine nets is a ritual that involves singing and rhythmically tugging at the line at specific intervals dictated by a leader with a whistle.
28 November 2016

Between Two Waters

Keta, Volta Region, is sandwiched between the Gulf of Guinea and the Keta Lagoon. The Keta Lagoon,126.13 km in length, is separated from the Gulf of Guinea by a narrow strip of sandbar. Majority of the land is lost to the ocean, family homes are now underwater. Sans a sea defense project that was undertaken by former president Jerry John Rawlings, the entire city would be... Read More
26 November 2016

Fort Prinzenstein, A Slave & Trade Post

The Dutch West India Company built Fort Singelenburgh at the site of the current fort in 1734, but the Dutch were made to abandon the fort in 1737, probably because of the Dutch siding with the defeated Akwamu in the Akyem-Akwamu conflict. The Danish had developed a presence in Keta, the commercial capital of Anlo. However, in 1783 when the people of Anlo pillaged the local Danish... Read More
16 November 2016

Grilled Fish And Fresh Pepper

Fried fish and pepper with a cold glass of beer lurking in the background. This dish is enjoyed with either Banku or Kenkey. The dish is, originally, a staple of the Ga’s from Greater Accra Region in Ghana. It’s prepared in many variations but it’s simply fried or grilled fish fresh from the ocean, fresh ground pepper (pepper, onions, tomatoes, and salt), and Kenkey, a starchy corn meal similar to... Read More
15 November 2016

Ewe Proverb, Two Calabashes Floating

“Etre ve no tsi dzi megbea nui ka wonoe wo o“_Ewe Proverb, Ghana. Translated as “Two calabashes floating in a basin of water will touch each other, but not damage each other.” This means that our disagreement should not lead to our destruction.  
12 November 2016

Players Of Real Republicans Club And Family Members

Players of Real Republicans Football Club with members of their family. Players include Adjei, Ben Acheampong,Addo Odamettey, Dodoo Ankrah,EO Oblittey, Nkansah, Gladstone Ofori, Edward Acquah, Aggrey Fyn, Gibrine, Yaw Pare.  
05 November 2016

Real Republicans Club, 1964-65 Team Display Trophies

Real Republicans Football Club,1964-65 team display some of their trophies won during an illustrious footballing period. Standing (L-R): Adjei, Ben Acheampong,Addo Odamettey, Dodoo Ankrah,EO Oblittey, Nkansah. Sitting (L-R): Gladstone Ofori, Edward Acquah, Aggrey Fyn, Gibrine, Yaw Pare.  
05 November 2016

Real Republicans Football Club, 1964-65 Team

Real Republicans Football Club,1964-65 team. This dream team from Ghana was assembled by picking 2 of the best players from each league team. Back row (L-R): Adjei, Ben Acheampong,Addo Odamettey, Dodoo Ankrah, Nkansah, EO Oblittey. Front row (L-R): Gladstone Ofori, Edward Acquah, Aggrey Fyn, Gibrine, Yaw Pare.  
05 November 2016

Real Republicans Football Club, 1963 Team

1963 Real Republicans Football Club, also known as OOC (Osaygefo’s Own Club). “Osagyefo” being Ghana’s first president, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah. The players of Real Republicans formed the backbone for the most successful Black Stars team assembled. Standing (L-R): Dodoo Ankrah, Franklin Crentsil, kwesi Appiah,Addo Odamettey, Ben Acheampong, EO Oblittey. Squatting (L-R): Agyeman Gyau, Edward Acquah, Aggrey Fyn, Yaw Pare, Baba Yara.  
01 November 2016

Ghana Black Stars In Kenya

In this picture (L-R): Kofi Pare, S. Acquah, Paa Nii Lutterodt, and Jones Attuquayefio. Ghana Black Stars enjoy some time off at the Ghana Embassy in Kenya. The Black Stars were invited by President Jomo Kenyatta to play against the Kenyan Nation team as part of their independence day celebrations. The Black Stars won by 13 goals to nothing, Kofi Pare (KOPA) scored 6 goals.... Read More
01 November 2016

Black Stars Players In Training

  1963-65 Black Stars Players play keep-ups in training. Facing camera: Ben Acheampong (left) and Kofi Pare.  
30 October 2016

Yenkassa Featured In FIFA Magazine

Our goal is to share. Yenkassa photo collected from Kofi Pare is featured in the October 2016 edition of FIFA Magazine. In this picture (L-R): Kofi Pare, S. Acquah, Paa Nii Lutterodt, and Jones Attuquayefio. Ghana Black Stars enjoy some time off at the Ghana Embassy in Kenya. The Black Stars were invited by President Jomo Kenyatta to play against the Kenyan Nation team as... Read More
25 October 2016

Takai Coffee & Cocoa Liqueur

Takai is the liquor made in Ghana and by far, the best liqueur in the world. The bottle is shaped like the body of a woman to embody the sweetness that lies within. It’s produced by GIHOC Distilleries with rigorously selected cocoa beans from Ghana and the best coffee beans from East Africa.
24 October 2016

Caffeine Crush

Somewhere in Adabraka, Accra. Ghanaians are not known for drinking coffee but for the few who do, Nescafe (instant coffee) is the brand choice. This needs to change considering Africa produces some of the best coffee on the planet.
24 October 2016

Vume Potters Association

Vume, Volta Region in Ghana. The town’s natural beauty and inexhaustible flora and fauna, serene lake gardens and abundant clay deposit have inspired the women to go into pottery. In Vume, 98% of the women are potters and they inherited the art from their parents.
19 October 2016

Beautiful Picture Sad History

View from the ocean (Cape Coast Castle): For slaves who were taken across the Atlantic Ocean to be sold, this would be the last image of their motherland. The Trans-Atlantic slave trade started in 1441 when the Portuguese captains, Antão Gonçalves and Nuno Tristão, captured 12 Africans in Cabo Branco (modern Mauritania) and took them to Portugal as slaves. Britain banned slavery in 1807 and on... Read More
19 October 2016

Courtyard: Cape Coast Slave Castle

The Slave Castle at Cape Coast, Central Region of Ghana: Slaves from West Africa were captured, held in the dungeons, and later shipped over the Atlantic ocean to places like New England, Virginia, Alabama, and the Carolinas. As you can see, the courtyard doubled as a graveyard.
18 October 2016

Word to The Wise: Tell Your Story

Proverbs: “Until the Lion Has His Historians, The Hunter Will Always Be The Hero.” This wise saying is inscribed on the dungeon walls at Fort Prinzenstein in Keta, Volta Region. For your information, Fort Prinzenstein was one of the gateways for the trans-Atlantic slave trade.
15 October 2016

Adabraka Smart Boy

He said to me, “I know it’s a silly hat but I like wearing it, I think different.” By the way, this boy is as smart as they come, straight A student.
14 October 2016

The Girl From Adabraka

She was in the middle of her school assignment/homework. Adabraka, located 1.8km/1.1mi from Accra city center, is best known for the O’Reilly Senior High School.
13 October 2016

Farm Fresh: Palm Fruit Palm Oil

Freshly harvested palm fruit waiting to be transported to urban markets around Ghana. Oil palm plantations were established in Ghana by 1850.
13 October 2016

Farm Fresh: Organic Tomatoes

These fresh organic tomatoes are straight from the farm to the roadside market. Fruits and vegetables taste better in Ghana especially, in the villages; the food is delicious because it’s prepared with fresh chemical free produce. FYI; Akumadan, a district in the Ashanti Region, produce more tomatoes than any other town in Ghana.
11 October 2016

DIY: Keta Boat Builder

Man building a boat with a chainsaw by the beach in Keta, Volta Region. Keta is sandwiched between the Gulf of Guinea and the Keta Lagoon. The Keta Lagoon,126.13 km in length, is the largest of the over 90 lagoons that cover the coastline of Ghana. It is separated from the Gulf of Guinea by a narrow strip of sandbar. This open salty water is... Read More
10 October 2016

Faces: Woman From Keta

Woman from Keta, Volta Region of Ghana. Before the arrival of Europeans in the 15th century, the Keta area was part of the African kingdom of Anlo. The settlement was a port for trade in ivory, spices, and gold. The expanding Asante empire controlled much of the region by the first half of the 18th century.
08 October 2016

The Boy In The Lake

Found this boy from Beyin swimming in Lake Tadane. Lake Tadane is a seasonal lake that rises dramatically during the wet season between May and August.
08 October 2016

The Beyin Nzulezu Channel

Travelling from Nzulezu to Beyin, Western Region, Ghana. The only means of transportation to and from Nzulezu, a world heritage designated village, is by boat on Lake Tadane. Access to Nzulezu for foreigners is regulated by the Tourism authorities, tickets must be obtained from Beyin on the mainland. The waterways often lead through thick bush along canals equipped with traditional fish traps.
07 October 2016

The Milling Machine

Corn Milling Machine – Had a love-hate relationship with this machine; love because it churns out the corn dough needed to cook most of Ghanaian staple foods. Hate because, during childhood, someone threatened to shred my pocket money on the rotating belt. Ahhh, memories!
06 October 2016

Street Food: Dzowe

Dzowe (jo-weh) – Dzowe literally means “fire dough” in the Ewe language from the Volta Region, Ghana. This slightly sweet doughy snack is also spicy and has a kick to it that’s why it has “fire” in its name. Growing up, this was a delicacy of some sort.
06 October 2016

Street Food: Atadwe (Tiger Nuts)

Atadwi (a.k.a. Tiger Nuts) – Helps prevent constipation because it’s high in fibre, is a good source of vitamin E, and helps reduce hot flushes associated with premature menopause. It’s also widely known to be an aphrodisiac, enhances stamina, helping men do the do.
06 October 2016

Street Food: Roasted Plantains

Roasted ripe plantains with groundnuts (peanuts) is an excellent afternoon snack. The trick to roasting delicious plantains is by picking naturally ripened fruit, don’t induce ripening. Fun Facts: Over 90% of street food vendors are women, most are married, and none see it as a career of choice.
04 October 2016

Beyin School Girls

School girls from Beyin, Western Region of Ghana. Education in Ghana is compulsory and structured as such: Pre-School (Ages 3-5) Basic/Primary School equivalent to Elementary School (Ages 6-11) Junior High School equivalent to Middle School (Ages 12-14) Senior High School equivalent to High School (Ages 15-17) Tertiary Education/Institution equivalent to College/ University (Ages 18-21) There are also Vocational and Teacher Training Institutions in Ghana.
04 October 2016

School Girl From Beyin

School girl from Beyin, Western Region of Ghana. The world heritage water dwelling village on stilts, Nzulezu, is just a boat ride from Beyin.
26 September 2016

1960 Nkrumah Commemorative Coin

1960 republic day 2 pounds gold proof commemorative Coin. The Ghana cedi is the unit of currency of Ghana. President Kwame Nkrumah introduced Cedi notes and Pesewa coins in July 1965 to replace the Ghana pounds, shilling and pence after they decided to leave the British colonial monetary system and adopt the widely accepted decimal system.
25 September 2016

President Kwame Nkrumah And Queen Elizabeth II

Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, prime minister of Ghana, with Queen Elizabeth II at Balmoral Castle. Kwame Nkrumah became an international icon of freedom as the leader of the first African country to cast off the chains of colonial rule. He was a teacher by 15yrs of age, studied at Lincoln University, PA, USA, post-graduate in London, returned to Gold Coast, fought for independence from the British and... Read More
24 September 2016

Operation Cold Chop

“Operation Cold Chop” was the codename for the 1966 coup d’état that overthrew Kwame Nkrumah’s democratically elected government. In 1965, the then Lieutenant–Colonel Kotoka (left) was transferred to Kumasi where he met and became friends with then Major Akwasi Amankwa Afrifa, an officer in the Second Brigade of the Ghana army. The two are generally credited with being among the key conspirators behind the first... Read More
21 September 2016

The Girl From Ada

In Ghana, people can tell which part of the country you are from by looks, name, and language or accent. This girl from Ada Foah spends her leisure time at the beach with her friends.
21 September 2016

Coconut Sunshine

Fresh coconuts from the pristine beaches of Gomoa Fete. Some call it the “tree of life,” others call it “heaven’s beer,” and also, the “lazy man’s crop” because it does not need much attention after planting. Although coconut was first introduced in the Volta Region of Ghana in the 16th century by Portuguese missionaries, the bulk of its production now comes from the Western Region, particularly the Jomoro... Read More
21 September 2016

Convenient Store

The roadside store, appropriately called “convenient” store in Ghana is equivalent to the Bodega in the USA. When in Ghana, support these small businesses.  
18 September 2016

Photo Stories: WWII Veteran JB Quansah

WWII veteran Jacob Buabin Quansah shares photos from the past. He was born on December 9th, 1921 in the coastal town of Apam, Ghana. He fought the Japanese in Burma during the 2nd World War and also fought the British to gain independence for Ghana.
17 September 2016

The Boy From Ada

Boy by the coast of Ada Foah, the tourism center of the Dangme East District with its beaches, the estuary (where the Volta River flows into the Atlantic ocean). The river shore is mostly blocked by holiday chalets as many people from Accra use the place as a weekend getaway. Boats can be rented for a cruise around the islands in the river. The nearby Ghana Sailing... Read More
17 September 2016

Hauling In The Day’s Catch

Townspeople, by the coast of Ada Foah, help fishermen haul in their fishing net after fishing through the night. Help hands are “paid-in-fish.” About 10 % of the country’s population is engaged in various aspects of the fishing industry. Marine fisheries account for over 80 % of the fish consumed in Ghana. however, freshwater fisheries including aquaculture is on the rise.
16 September 2016

Humble Beginnings Of The Next Soccer Star

Playing the beautiful game by the beach of the Atlantic Ocean in Osu, Accra. Besides well-manicured playing fields, the next generation of Black Stars players play football/soccer on the streets, by the beach and, practically, on any bare surface.        
16 September 2016

The Next Black Stars Superstars

The typical path to stardom for an aspiring football star begins on the streets/the bare fields, then to “colts” (under 12) football, club football (Hearts, Kotoko), and finally to a top professional football team somewhere in Europe.       
16 September 2016

Street Life, Madina Estate

Ghana’s major airport, Kotoka International Airport, is about 5miles from Madina Estate and neighboring towns like East Legon, Legon, Shia Shie.       
16 September 2016

Project Runway

Seamstress preparing to sew the traditional dress called “Kaba” with GTP (Ghana Textile Printing) cloth. Kaba was the go-to dress, after independence, for Ghanaian women who wanted to step out in style. It’s still very popular regardless of the influx of western fashion.       
16 September 2016

Standing Guard

Came face-to-face with this nice guy somewhere in East Legon, a suburb of Accra. Ghanaians have changed their attitudes towards their canine friends, especially, with exotic breeds becoming popular these days.        
13 September 2016

No Electricity, No Problem

Fill the box iron with charcoal, light it up, leave to heat, iron clothes. Remember, regulate the temperature by the amount of charcoal added. Box iron was especially popular among secondary school (boarding house) and college students even when the electric iron was later introduced. It’s useful these days in Ghana because of the power curtailment (dumsor) policy of the electricity department.     
13 September 2016

Batakari, Ghanaian Smock

Batakari (Smock in English) was originally worn by kings and warriors from Sub-Sahara Africa but popular in northern Ghana. It’s made with strips of cloths made of a mixture of dyed and undyed cotton loom. The strips are sewn together by hand or machine giving the Batakari a plaid appearance. Batakari are usually embroidered at the neckline and worn with a kufi cap however, chiefs in Ghana... Read More
11 September 2016

Boats And Beaches, Keta

Picturesque Keta coastline. The main occupation of residents of Keta is fishing thanks to being bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Keta Lagoon.
11 September 2016

On The Volta River At Dawn

The Volta River is, arguably, the number one landmark of Ghana. My mother once told me they used to swim in the river when they were kids. Mind you, the river is infested with crocodiles—brave souls, these Voltarians. Contact us if you have any related (Volta River) stories.
11 September 2016

Cape St. Paul Lighthouse

This old lighthouse (built in 1901) is located in Woe, just off Keta’s Municipalities main road. It is currently used to direct ships away from what is believed to be a big submerged mountain just off the coast of Woe. The summit presents fantastic views of Keta’s beautiful sandy beaches and Woe’s famous farming land.
10 September 2016

No Wheel Cart Zone

The Accra market was relocated because the Movenpick Hotel was built so close to the central place of commerce. These signs are everywhere now to prohibit wheel cart operators from using nearby roads to transport goods from the market to the bus/trotro stations.
10 September 2016

Five Star Treatment In Accra

Movenpick Hotel is a five-star hotel built at the location where the famous Ambassador Hotel used to stand in its full glamour. Apparently, the Movenpick has the largest/longest pool in West Africa.
10 September 2016

Can You hear Me, How About Now?

In Ghana, it’s normal to own multiple phones because users find it economical to purchase and refill sim cards/chips from multiple providers. People may also dedicate a phone specifically for business and another for domestic use.
09 September 2016

Ghana Kitchen Essentials, Dadesen

Dadesen is a cast iron cauldron used in cooking Ghanaian staple foods such as Kenkey (Komi in Ga, Dokuno in Twi), Banku, Djidjin, plantain, yams, etc. Before there was the gas stove, Ghanaians cooked with charcoal on the “coalpot” and before that, there was the clay molded tripod. According to both research and popular belief, food cooked over the clay tripod and coalpot tasted better than food... Read More
08 September 2016

Alasa Fruit

Alasa (Ah-lah-sah) Fruit – Suck the pulp from the seed, chew the inner membrane until it turns to gum, play games with the seeds by flicking it into a hole, etc. It also packs more vitamin C than an orange. The bark from the tree has anti-plasmodial effects thus serving as a remedy for yellow fever or malaria. English and botanical names are African star apple... Read More
06 September 2016

Makola Market

The scene at Makola market (1980s) in Accra. Also on display is the resourcefulness of the Ghanaian woman.
05 September 2016

Generations Immortalized

In Ghana (and Africa), old age is associated with wisdom and Knowledge. It’s, therefore, imperative to have their voices heard by the younger generation. The senior citizen pictured here is fun to be around and made our visit a memorable one.
03 September 2016

Seventies Driver’s License

Drivers license from the late seventies (1979), Ghana.License issued to Jacob Buabin Quansah in Accra for a fee of Six Cedis.
02 September 2016

In Defense of Her Majesty

World War II letter of participation given to veteran Jacob Buabin Quansah, a member of the West African Frontier Force. His life story begins in a coastal town called Apam and takes us through India, Burma and back to Ghana to fight for independence.
01 September 2016

Jungle War!

World War II veteran Jacob Buabin Quansah displays his medals. As a member of the West African Frontier Force, he fought the Japanese in Burma now Myanmar. He went to war when he was 20 years old and returned to Ghana (formerly Gold Coast) to celebrate his 25th birthday. Upon return, himself and other servicemen led the fight for independence from the British.
31 August 2016

Apam! Small Town, Vibrant History

Apam was the capital of Gomoa district. The locals however, called it “Apaa” instead of its current name, Apam. The main occupation is fishing, supplying the surrounding landlocked villages with fish. The nearby salty lagoon has resulted in a vibrant salt industry. There is a secondary school (high school) and a hospital that serves the people of Apam and the surrounding areas. One of the main... Read More
29 August 2016

Fort Lijdzaamheid or Fort Patience, Apam

Fort Patience or Fort Lijdzaamheid (Dutch 17th-century spelling, Leydsaemheyt), is a Dutch-built fort located in the township of Apam, Central Region of Ghana. The fort was first built as a stone trading lodge in 1697 at the request of the King of Acron (situated between the kingdoms of Fante and Agona) with whom the Dutch had a treaty. The executives of the Dutch West India Company... Read More